The Satanic/Talmudic Origins of Star Trek


STXI_Jlogo2_s Almost every Trekkie out there views the Star Trek phenomenon as a fantasy of the New age of secular humanism (Enlightened Human Society), but to the adepts and initiates it is a Talmudic doctrine of Satan.the various alien races are various earthly cultures and Vulcans are the the Jews, due to their “wisdom”and The Borg I think are the devilish depiction of Islam and/or “the people of the book”. Think about it, they assimilate cultures by force “Holy Wars” and make them into a collective or “Umah” or nation of Faith (this is the Talmudic depiction of Islam as well). The assimilated is no longer human or partaking in sinful pleasure, but rather abstains from sin. This demonizes the notion of the unity of one nation under God “Umah” and glorifies disunity under the guise of diversity, man’s achievements in place of God’s Creation, and finally promotion of impulsive primal animal-like behavior under the guise of unlocking your potential, developing your superpower, or evolving.

“Nimoy drew upon his own Jewish background to suggest the now-familiar salute. Back in the 1960s, hippies who watched “Amok Time” thought the salute was a variation of the two-fingered peace sign. But we Jews knew better. The Vulcan salute came not from protest marches, but from the pulpit of Nimoy’s childhood synagogue.

The Vulcan greeting is based upon a blessing gesture used by the kohanim (koe-hah-NEEM) during the worship service. The kohanim are the genealogical descendants of the Jewish priests who served in the Jerusalem Temple. Modern Jews no longer have priests leading services as in ancient times, nor do we have animal sacrifices anymore. (Yes, people really do ask about that!) The sacrificial system ended with the destruction of the Temple by the Romans in the year 70. C.E. However, a remnant of the Temple service lives on in the “kohane blessing” ritual (duchenen in Yiddish) that is performed on certain holy days. ” excerpt from The Jewish Origin of the Vulcan Salute by Rabbi Yonassan Gershom trekjews.com

Religion seems to be largely absent from the futuristic and secular world of the Federation and in particular from human society. Star Trek’s takes on religious topics are often critical, and they almost routinely close with a victory of science over faith. This is anything but a surprise, knowing that Gene Roddenberry was an active atheist who struggled against any form of religion:

“I condemn false prophets, I condemn the effort to take away the power of rational decision, to drain people of their free will — and a hell of a lot of money in the bargain. Religions vary in their degree of idiocy, but I reject them all. For most people, religion is nothing more than a substitute for a malfunctioning brain.” (Gene Roddenberry)

In a Q&A session executive producer Brannon Braga was asked whether there was supposed to be a deity in the stories that he wrote. He said:

“No, there was no consideration in giving humans, talking about God, or talking about those types of things. We wanted to avoid it to be quite frank. But we did very often explore theology through alien characters. Which frankly is much more interesting anyway. Whether it was the Bajorans and their religion or the Borg and their religion. They had the religion of perfection. That, I think, was more interesting. We want to keep Star Trek secular. The human facet of Star Trek secular.” (Brannon Braga, transcript from his former website)” excerpt from: Religion in Star Trek

If daily life is not concerned with familiar economic activities and the whole of life is not informed with religious purposes, then what is life all about in Star Trek? Well, the story is about a military establishment, Star Fleet, and one ship in particular in the fleet, the Enterprise. One might not expect this to provide much of a picture of ordinary civilian life; and it doesn’t. One never sees much on Earth apart from the Star Fleet Academy and Picard’s family farm in France — unless of course we include Earth’s past, where the Enterprise spends much more time than on the contemporaneous Earth. Since economic life as we know it is presumed not to exist in the future, it would certainly pose a challenge to try and represent how life is conducted and how, for instance, artifacts like the Enterprise get ordered, financed, and constructed. And if it is to be represented that things like “finance” don’t exist, one wonders if any of the Trek writers or producers know little details about Earth history like when Lenin wanted to get along without money and accounting and discovered that Russia’s economy was collapsing on him. Marx’s prescription for an economy without the cash nexus was quickly abandoned and never revived. Nevertheless, Marx’s dream and Lenin’s disastrous experiment is presented as the noble and glorious future in Star Trek: First Contact, where Jean Luc Picard actually says, “Money doesn’t exist in the Twenty-Fourth Century.”

So what one is left with in Star Trek is military life. Trying to soften this by including families and recreation on the Enterprise in fact makes the impression worse, since to the extent that such a life is ordinary and permanent for its members, it is all the easier to imagine that all life in the Federation is of this sort. Not just a military, but a militarism. In the show, this actually didn’t work out very well. In the beginning, Star Trek: The Next Generation wanted to remind us of the daily life, children in school, etc. on board; and more than once the “battle hull” of the ship was separated from the “saucer” so that the civilian component of the crew would be safe from hostile action. This cumbersome expedient, however, was soon enough forgotten; and we later forget, as the Enterprise finds itself in desperate exchanges with hostile forces, that small children are undergoing the same battle damage that we see inflicted on the bridge — unless of course it is brought to our attention because there is a story with a special focus on a child, as with Lieutenant Worf’s son. In Star Trek: First Contact, crew members are being captured and turned into Borg. Does that include the children? We never see any. Do Picard’s orders to shoot any Borg include Borg who were human children? This disturbing situation is completely ignored by the movie. Star Trek, therefore, cannot maintain its fiction that military life on a major warship will be friendly to families and children. excerpt from The Fascist Ideology of Star Trek: Militarism, Collectivism, & Atheism

Jewcy.com
May 19, 2009

As seems de rigeur for this sort of post, let me prove my Star Trek bona fides (or lack thereof) before going forward. I was a child of Star Trek: The Next Generation, only three years old when it premiered, but ten when it concluded and old enough to remember the season finale broadcast. I later caught up on every episode of that series. I have also seen more than a handful of the original series, and about two to three dozen episodes of Deep Space 9. So I’m not trekkie, as it goes. But I’m familiar with the shows, and if my knowledge is not encyclopedic, it is viable. I may not be able to recall the exact science-fiction hook used in season 4, episode seven offhand, but if you hum a few bars, I think I could sing along.

Once said, let’s put that to rest. If my credentials aren’t enough to discuss the new film with any depth, please skip ahead. I won’t be offended. I understand fandom, and if someone wanted to write about the X-Men without an encyclopedic background, I’d thank them kindly to their face and say bad things about them behind their backs. So go ahead. Say bad things.

What struck me about the film was the role of the Jew, or the lack thereof. The Original Series always had Leonard Nimoy as Spock. He was not simply the intellectual rationalist to Kirk’s fly-by-the-seat-of-his-pants adventurer, as a number of critics have suggested. What is clear from those earliest episodes is that Spock was an equal partner in the great adventure. He may have brought a cooler head from time to time, but the mission was equally his. As such, he was something of a philosopher-warrior, a Jewish archetype rare in contemporary society, but rich in our history; from the Biblical Joshua, King David, to Franz Rosenzweig writing The Star of Redemption “in the Macedonian trenches,” or maybe David Ben-Gurion.

The Next Generation took the Jew in Star Trek one step further. Despite not having as public a Jewish identity as Nimoy in a main role, one could say TNG was even more Jewish than the Original Series. Watch them argue about the Prime Directive, debate subtleties of ethical and intellectual dilemmas, or entirely forgo physical confrontation in favor of multiculturalism and empathy. Hell, the crew was so neurotic, they kept a full-time therapist on the ship. The greatest triumphs were not the defeat of an adversary, but the breaching of borders, the comprehension of foreign language. Watch “Darmok,” in my most humble opinion the greatest episode of The Next Generation. It is moving beyond words.

I mean, they might as well have called it Star Trek: The Great Jew Extravaganza. The central themes of the Star Trek shows – exploring new worlds, making contact with new civilizations, doing mitzvoth and good deeds throughout the universe – are central tenets of Judaism. Would a Michael Lerner luncheon have been out of place on The Next Generation? Picard was already, always doing birur nitzutzot (elevating the sparks of the universe) and performing tikkun on the galaxies.

I have no doubt the Jew in Star Trek has been explored and interrogated at greater lengths than I could do justice to. Certainly, if there were no Jews in Star Trek, there was still plenty of locations for a Jew to find himself in the show. And yet, now, we have J.J. Abram’s new Star Trek and, despite enjoying the spectacle, I find myself wondering: Where has the Jew gone? At first, the obvious issues; there is no exploration, no new worlds to discover. If anything, there’s the collapse of old worlds – the destruction of Vulcan. There’s a political agenda; sometimes terrorists can’t be negotiated with (Spoiler alert: Eric Bana’s villain chooses to die rather than accept Kirk’s compassion).

Spock is no longer played by a Jew, but by Zachary Quinto (whom I know as the villain Sylar on Heroes). That itself is not a problem, but coupled with the character’s transformation makes him into a non-Jewish figure. He is now quick to rush to anger and violence, not to fight based on logic but based on emotional betrayal. He is vindictive against Kirk, and he now embarks on a fairly public love affair with Uhura. In other words, he is an arrogant bore, and he lacks wisdom, possessing only intellect.

This move is made all the more evident by the inclusion of the old Spock, Leonard Nimoy, in the film. Nimoy is everything that Quinto’s Spock is not. He is thoughtful, caring, and wise. When he calls the young Kirk his longtime friend, the scene is poignant and moving. Tellingly, the character is a man literally caught out of time – a refugee from a future time – much as the ethos he once represented are too caught out of time. This new Star Trek has no place for deliberation over ethics, or warm human contact. Compare Nimoy’s brief moments with Kirk to Quinto’s moments. One is deeply connected to the human. The other, no matter how many times the film may argue otherwise, is deeply alienated from the human experience. No, this Spock is no Jew. He truly is alien.

This would bother me far less if the movie didn’t hold the promise of future installments. The film is doing well in release and I have no doubt a sequel is already in the works. But can they possibly use Nimoy again? It seems unlikely – his role here was as intermediary, ferrying the series from the Roddenberry vision to the Abrams’ vision. I imagine he’ll be gone in the next film and then we’ll be left with no Jew at all, just a bunch of very entertaining goyim canvassing the universe. Maybe they’ll decide to explore strange new worlds, but I doubt it. Abram’s likes his monsters. There’ll be a new villain, a new world-ending catastrophe, another distended-anus snow creature. There isn’t a lot of time for tikkun ha’olem when you’re reacting against terrorists and psychopaths. Or rather, there should be time made, but who will make it? Our only hope, I fear, is that Chris Pine’s Kirk grows into the role Spock once held. He does seem to have sensitivity and a thoughtfulness hiding just behind his impetuousness and impulsiveness. Maybe he’ll cultivate it.

The narrative itself addressed this. Nimoy-Spock tells Quinto-Spock in one of the final moments that he’ll hide out of sight, working on the preservation of Vulcan cultural heritage. And that, finally, is what the Jew of Star Trek has been reduced to: A cultural heritage, a memory of a series long past. Now, we look to the future. Too bad J.J. Abrams is such a goy.

The above article can be found at: Jew Trek

Like many other aspects of the Star Trek world, these dicta are simple “there” – given an explanation only when the story calls for it. Roddenberry used his shows as a type of very passive or yinful propaganda: he merely SHOWED what could be, what humans COULD become if they developed certain potentials.

Likewise, the fact that in the 1960’s the original Trek series had a crew including people of many nations and races, and both genders – and, to top it off, an alien Second in Command, Mr. Spock! Yet this was not explained, it was simply presented. Another beautiful Roddenberrian idea is the Vulcan motto of “Infinite Diversity in Infinite Combinations.”

One way of seeing this is that there is a TREND in society. Some people are “hung up” on what could be called personal issues, or behaviors borne of inner conflict like bottled-up rage, broken self-hood, warped sexuality or emotionality, or similar developmental problems. These people seem to “go nowhere” – they don’t Become, because they are “stuck on themselves.” Everything they do is a reflection of their warped selves and inability to grow or develop – their lives play like broken records in what seem to be abortive attempts to repair or correct psychological problems. Satanically speaking, people like this are pent-up/apathetic, and ophionic – two stages of the same problem. They are unable to Become – they only stagnate and Unbecome (self-destruct). Societies where these people predominate do likewise: stagnate and unbecome. They are all increasingly stress-filled, illogical, and inhumane.

And there is another trend in society – this could be called the Progressive movement, or Enlightenment movement. Note the Satanic connotations of these words: Progressive, as in Becoming – and Enlightened, as in The Light or Black Flame. These people tend to focus on very practical problems outside the self: better education for people, improving quality of life, better food, less work, less stress, less crime, etc. Focus is on phenomena – the outer – the world! As in, exploring the galaxy! Enjoying the world, and improving the world for more enjoyment and less pain. The self is not an issue with people like this – and in a sense people like this are “alooof” because they are inwardly content. This latter trend, politically, tends to make societies that are more equitable, less stressful, more humane.

Star Trek is merely a continuation of this latter trend – without the “garbage” associated with the first, negative trend.

excerpt from To Boldly Go… a self admitted Satanic socialist website!

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One Response to “The Satanic/Talmudic Origins of Star Trek”

  1. Come on Says:

    Are you fucking retarded? Get a life!

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